Inside A Beautiful Mind – Dee Wilson

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Good Morning Everyone and happy Friday

Welcome to Inside A Beautiful Mind.

For those of you who have been here before, go grab your coffee, tea or beverage of choice and come sit with me as we get comfy and have a visit with my new friend Dee Wilson.

Good Morning Dee, thank you for hanging out with me this morning and being a part of Inside A Beautiful Mind.
For those of you who don’t know, Dee and I were recently contenders in the 2017 Kobo Emerging Writers competition and Dee was awarded the winners prize. Just want to take this moment to say a HUGE Congrats to you on winning. Amazing accomplishment, so proud of you.

So now let’s get to it and tell our readers a little bit about yourself.

Me, in numbers… I’m a redhead, and meet all the requirements of such. I run two Dee Willson Photo 3, Color, Web Sizebusinesses. I have two beautiful daughters. Hubby and I are celebrating twenty years. I love to read and write. I am the author of two books, with another two on the way.

Can you tell us about your books?

I am the author of A Keeper’s Truth, and GOT (Gift of Travel). I am currently working on the second installment of A Keeper’s Truth, titled The Truth Enslaved, and a quirky coming-of-age identy struggle titled No Apology For Being.

What inspired you to write your first book, A Keeper’s Truth?

A Keeper’s Truth came to me in a dream, and wouldn’t let go. The urge to note what I’d seen and heard in my sleep was strong, and I found myself writing a novel before the concept really entered my mind. I guess you can say I was compelled, versus inspired.

Is anything in your book based on real life experiences or purely all imagination?
There are scenes inspired by events in my life, but the characters and situations are not details I’ve experienced personally. One of my favorite scenes (in the book) describes a moment I shared with a stranger in a mall, when my daughter was a baby. A woman approached me insisting my daughter was an old soul, that she’d lived many lives. She claimed my daughter “knows things.” Quite freaky at the time, but has meaning in hindsight. Or could have meaning, should one attempt to interpret the concept.

What was your favorite parts to write and why?
Hmm… I think my favorite scenes to write were between Bryce and Thomas, the two leading men. They have a complicated history, so there is all this tension, and hidden subtleties that could only come through during dialogue. They are also very strong personalities, making their dialogue fun to write.

How did you come up with the titles?
I never seem to struggle with titles. Or character names. They are just there, like they are part of the story waiting to be told. Sometimes, as is the case with No Apology For Being, the title comes to me on a whim, and then I hear all or parts mentioned in conversations, or on television, or on the radio, and I sort of feel like the universe is trying to tell me I’m onto something. LOL.

What has been the toughest criticism given to you as an author? What has been the best compliment?
We live in a world where money, success, and acclaim are tightly entwined. I think the toughest criticism to take as an author, is to see how little money your work is (sometimes) worth. To others, anyway. And I am, hands down, my worst critic. The best KOBO Awards Ceremony, 2017compliment was winning the Kobo Best Canadian Emerging Writer Award. I would like to say the pat on the back isn’t necessary, but it really does feel good.

Do you have any unique or quirky writing habits?
My worst habit is not writing at all. I live a busy life, and I wish writing could always take the front seat, but it doesn’t always work out that way. I can’t write with noise or chaos happening around me. I’m not good at staying focused. I have to write in a different room than where I work, so I don’t get distracted by email and paperwork calling my name. LOL.

What’s the strangest thing you have ever had to research online for your book?
What it feels like to die. Like the actual feel of it. How would this ever really be documented, anyway? LOL.

Give us an interesting fun fact about your book.

The original draft of A Keeper’s Truth was twenty thousand words over the published version, and took me less than ten weeks to write. Learning what I’d done wrong, however, and how to edit those overwritten words, took me almost four years, and countless more words as notes. Writing is one thing. Learning to write well is another altogether.

Do you work with an outline, or just write?

A Keeper’s Truth was written on a whim. The first draft, anyway. I learned my lesson, however, and wrote GOT (Gift of Travel) with a clear outline. No Apology For Being is outlined as well, to the point where the story is written before it’s written. I find this allows me to focus on the words, the sentence structure, the characters, without getting caught up in the plot or loose ends.

Can you tell us about your experiences in getting your first book published?
I signed with an agent of a reputable firm, but her personal struggles overtook her career and I found myself unrepresented within a year. A Keeper’s Truth was sold to Driven Press. They are a small imprint with big dreams. I love what they aim for, what they represent, and how they support me and my writing. They listened to my opinion regarding the publishing details of A Keeper’s Truth, and I’m not convinced I would have felt the same love from a bigger publisher. That said, their size makes distribution and marketing difficult. Every author should do their homework, and decide what route is best for them. This even changes with future works, as our writing career isn’t stagnant.

When did you first start writing and when did you finish your first book?

I have my first rejection letter from Berkley Publishing. I keep it framed, to remind me of the long path I’ve taken. I was fifteen. I didn’t finish the first draft of A Keeper’s Truth until I was in my thirties. I often say that writing took the slowly marinated route to me.AKT e-book cover final 1400x2100

How did you choose the genre you write in?
I write genre? LOL. I write the story that comes to me. Genre is for marketing teams and retailers. That said, I tend to write similar to what I like to read, which is fast pace books that cross genre lines and blur rules. I like to think outside the box, and stuff formula under the carpet.

Where do you get your ideas?
They come to me on a breeze. Anytime. Anywhere. Usually they start with some silly notion or curiosity. GOT (Gift of Travel), for example, was brought to me by roadkill. Yep, you read that right, roadkill. I was on a road trip with the kids and couldn’t believe the number of poor dead animals on the side of the road. Here I was, this selfish human being, driving my car through mountains and forests, while they had their lives brutally stripped by passing death-mobiles, just so we could get from point A to point B on a tight schedule. I found myself apologizing to each and every one. And GOT was born.

Is there any particular author or book that influenced you in any way?
The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger. Hands down, the best book ever written, in my mind. I have at least four copies, each battered from use, and refuse to admit how many times I’ve read and reread the book in its entirety, never mind specific pages. Every author could learn A LOT reading this book.

Do you have any advice to give to aspiring writers?
Write because you love to, because a story calls to you. Write because you can’t imagine doing anything else with your time. Not only will your future readers feel the love that you feel, but you’ll have gained something more valuable than money or praise. The craft in itself is a gift. Enjoy every moment.

What is your favorite quote or saying?
“Fear is just excitement in need of an attitude adjustment.”

Tea or coffee?
Tea. No caffeine.

Sweet or salty?
Both. Ideally, together.

Would you like to share with us a passage that will give us a glimpse into the world you built?
Every one of us has a soul. Some are new, some old, and a few, the dangerous, are lost. But only twelve know why we have a soul at all. Only twelve remember mankind’s forbidden past.

Would you mind sharing with us the best way to stay in touch with you and where to learn more about your books?
Absolutely!
Website: www.deewillson.com
Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/dee.willson.52
Goodreads author page: https://www.goodreads.com/DeeWillson
Twitter: @denisewillson

Alright folks, it is that time again but I would like to say a heart felt thank you to Dee Wilson for sharing with us and spending some time in her world today. Once again Congrats to you on a job well done. Keep your eyes on her.

Also, I would like to say a big thank you to the lovely readers out there for joining in and taking a moment to support your Authors.

If you or any of you know of someone who would like to be a part of Inside A Beautiful Mind, please send me a message.
Enjoy your Friday folks, you are awesome and please remember to be kind to your Authors, leave a review. See you in a couple of weeks, Peace.

Shadow Talkers and the Covenant of WHAT? #shadowtalkers

So I did something the other night. I made the first Episode of a series called “Shadow Talkers and the Covenant of What?”.

It is just a show on the fun side of life. It is an idea that manifested with my best friend Jenna McLean one day over a couple of beverages.  In this series we will discuss everything from different flavors of Oreos to books and what not.

Anyway, sometimes you just have to make fun of yourself and what better way to do that then on Youtube for the whole world to see.  Check it out and let me know what you think.

(We are looking for questions from the public so feel free to post them below and we will do a Q&A Episode down the road on ST & TCOW). Big hugs,

K

 

Inside A Beautiful Mind – Crystal MM Burton

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Good Morning Everyone and happy Friday

Welcome to Inside A Beautiful Mind.
For those of you who have been here before, go grab your coffee, tea or beverage of choice and come sit with me as we get comfy and have a most enchanting chat with my friend Crystal MM Burton.
Good Morning Crystal, thank you for hanging out with me this morning and being a part of Inside A Beautiful Mind.
So let’s get right to it, can you tell me a little bit about yourself.
Thank you for having me today! My name is Crystal, and I write under my real name, Crystal MM Burton. I live in the small, rural town of Lott, Texas, with my husband, our three children, and my Yorkie. If you were to 19911682_10154681459586475_1379521768_oask anyone about me, they’d probably tell you I’m a fangirl. I find it very easy to slip into fictional worlds and I often lose myself wishing they were real. I don’t have the time or space to list them all, but my main fandom is Doctor Who. It stands to reason that I was destined to create my own fictional worlds, too. I’ve self-published a children’s book (Mommy, What Is the Moon?) and I’ve been published in multiple anthologies and collaborative novels, but my first solo novel is in the works now.
Can you tell us about your current projects?
I’m one of those authors who has a whole folder dedicated to project ideas and starter chapters. But my main project, The World Soul, is a high fantasy series following a forest-dwelling exile on her quest to find the four elemental heartsouls and replenish the life energy of the world. My series is full of two unique breeds of mermaids, stone giants, a winged race, forest-dwellers, and of course, humans.
How hard was it to sit down and actually start writing something?
Harder than it should have been, to be honest. I don’t usually have an issue with sitting down and at least knocking out a rough draft. But with my novel series, my passion held me back. I was so worried about writing it wrong that I spent more time fussing over the outline than actually writing the story. I wanted it to be perfect. That still holds me back sometimes.
Do you set a plot or prefer going wherever an idea takes you?
Both, depending on the story. If I’m using a writing prompt, I just get a base idea in my head and let the prompt guide me. It’s a creative exercise for me. But if I have a real, solid idea for a story, I’ll sit down and do an eight-point plot outline to make sure my story has all the dramatic arcs and emotional elements it needs.
Over the years, what would you say has improved significantly in your writing?
I’m much more open with my thoughts. More confident in my ideas. When I first started writing, I was terrified of what people would think and how they would judge me. Nowadays, I take pride in my ideas and the way I portray them. This is my future and my legacy. I don’t want to lead readers around their own back yards, I want to lead them through jungles and under the oceans and to new, exciting places that only exist in my books.
What is the most important thing about a book, in your opinion?
Being relatable. When I read a book, I want to know that if I took the place of the main character, a lot of the events in the story wouldn’t change, because I’d do the same things, make the same mistakes, fall in love with the same people. I want secondary characters that I love to hate because I can understand them. Characters I’d want to be friends with. Characters I’d want to strangle because they remind me of someone I know. When we as readers can compare our lives to a book in some way, no matter how small, it gives us a connection. That’s so important.
Do your novels carry a message?
They do. Many messages, though not all of them are obvious.
Never lose hope; it’s the greatest motivator of all time. Be yourself. Find your balance and your world will have meaning. Dedicate your life to something greater than yourself. And never judge someone without knowing their side of the story.
How much of yourself do you put into your books?
All of me. Each character has something in common with me, even if it’s just a quirk or habit or hobby. A shared opinion or belief. A lot of authors do this without realizing it; I do it on purpose. It all goes back to relatability.
How realistic are your books?
They’re not as realistic as other genres (I do write about mermaids and stone giants, after all). However, I’m a firm believer that if something exists in a fantasy world, it should at least follow the same laws of physics that our world adheres to. If it’s too “out there,” it loses a big part of what keeps the reader comfortable. Yes, they want to escape, but they also want a world they can make sense of.
What is that one thing you think readers generally don’t know about your specific genre?
I don’t think many fantasy readers realize just how similar their fantasy worlds are to our own. I’ve mentioned before that readers tend toward fantasy to escape the real world, but nearly every successful fantasy story still has human elements and traits. Realistic notions and events. Political drama, domestic drama, rivalries, hopelessness. We escape it at home only to dive into it in a book, just because it’s not ours. It’s sugar-coated in magical creatures, spells, and far-off lands, but it’s the same thing.
How liberal are you in term of expressing ideas in your books?
If my characters require it, I’ll write it. There are many differing ideals, opinions, personalities, and cultures in my books. I have no problem writing any of them because they aren’t “me.” I would hope that anyone who knows of me would be able to differentiate between my personal ideals and those of my fictional characters.
Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
Getting it right. For some reason, I always seem to forget that I can always go back and add things in and rearrange. I get so caught up in not forgetting to include anything and in finding the right words that I get stuck. It’s part of my OCD, I think. Being a perfectionist is a huge challenge as a writer.
Writers are often believed to have a muse; what are your thoughts on that?
I think we all call it something different. Some people call it a muse, some call it their dreams, others just call it what it is: their imagination. The thing is, no one really knows where our ideas come from, so it’s almost comforting to imagine a magical deity whispering in our ears. I often make comments about my muse, treating her like a close friend. Many of my ideas stem from my dreams, so I tend to call my muse “the girl of my dreams.” Do I honestly believe there’s an otherworldy being feeding me all my ideas? No. Does it help me to personify the creative side of my brain? Definitely.
What is your view on co-authoring books; have you done any?
I have, actually. Quite often. The first collaborative work I participated in was a zombie fiction novel called Bit. I worked alongside five other authors, and that story turned out fantastically science-fiction-y. It will be published next year (2018).
I’ve also participated in what is called the Collaborative Writing Challenge, a program that brings masses of writers together under the guide of a story coordinator to collaborate on a novel. I’ve had chapters selected for four CWC projects to date, each one a different genre: sci-fi, drama/mystery, fantasy, and steampunk.
I think all authors should try at least once to collaborate on a writing project. The point of it doesn’t have to be something publishable, nor does it even need to be entirely coherent. Ultimately, it just makes a great writing exercise and helps you grow as a writer. The challenge to it is that you don’t have full control. Your characters take on a life of their own, because they’re being manipulated by multiple writers. I wouldn’t be the writer I am today without my experience in collaborative writing.
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Do you plan on owning a publishing house?
Yes and no. I am the creator and co-founder of Imagine House, an indie publishing imprint. I teamed up with my friend and fellow author Jae Dawn to create this company, but we’re not a traditional publisher. As we like to say, we’re more of a club. We can be found on Facebook, Twitter, and our website, imaginehouse.co. We focus on fantasy, but we encourage reading and writing in all genres. If you can dream it, you can write it. It’s like I always say… “As I imagine, so shall it be.”
Do you have a day job other than being a writer? And do you like it?
For the past eight years, I’ve been a stay-at-home mom. I have three kids—two boys and a girl—and raising them is a full-time job in itself. However, being a mother is not a career path. Which is why, in August 2016, I officially became a freelance fiction editor, and I love it. I had spent seven months as the Editing Director for a small press, so I had the skill and experience, and working for myself gives me the ability to set my own hours. The only downside I can think of is that I spend more time working on other people’s stories than my own, but that’s still pretty great.
Do you proofread and edit your work on your own or pay someone to do it for you?
For each of my stories, I first write it, revise it, pass it to beta readers, revise it once more, then toss it to a professional editor for the final pass. Even though I’m an editor myself, my work always needs to go to someone else for edits. No matter how great you think you might be, everyone needs an editor. As the creators, we’re just too close to our own work. We’ll miss things. I know editors can be expensive, but I strongly urge all writers to save up for a real editor. Trust me—self-publishing has the sad reputation it does because of self-publishers who thought they could do it themselves.
What do you do in your free time?
Ha! Free time! You’re funny. Everyone knows that’s just a myth.
If I did have any free time, though, I’d be tending to my garden, spending time with the animals, crocheting, having endless Netflix binges, gaming, or learning. I’m always learning. If it could be said that I have a single passion, it’s for knowledge.
What is the dream goal you want to achieve before you die?
My dream goal is to be published by one of the Big Five. I want to be a household name, like Tolkien, Rowling, Martin, or Jordan; I want people to hear “Burton” or “World Soul” and know that it’s me. I have a very strong feeling—hope, I think—that the Big Five can get me there. I’ve had my eye on Tor Fantasy since the day I decided to be a writer.
What advice would you like to pass on to young writers of today that is unconventional but true?
The best rule of writing is that there are no real rules. Yes, you will always have grammar rules. You can’t get around those. But most writing “rules” are just guidelines for beginners. Things like “no prologues,” or “don’t open with a dream,” or “don’t kill the dog.” They’re not hard laws, just strong suggestions. The trick is to figure out why someone says not to kill the dog, then determine if you have a solid reason for doing it. Anything can work in a story if done well. So, learn all the “rules” and why they exist before determining which rules you want to break.
How about sharing some of your book with us? Maybe a passage that will give us a glimpse into the world you built.
I’m still in a heavy outlining stage, and I’ve only written a few small sections that aren’t ready for the world just yet. But I’d love to tell you more about my books.
My series is based on one idea: the eyes are the windows to the soul. Except, that window doesn’t always lead to your own. Tarenya is an exile whose eyes lead directly to the world soul itself. When the stars begin to go out, she is set on a quest to find the heartsouls of the elements and restore the life energy of the world. Her traveling companions throughout the story include a dashing human pirate, First Mate Tennison, a young stone giant, Mmrmr, and the Salcean princess, Breann.
There are seven races in my world. The first one you’ll meet is the forest-dwelling Avendii. They are a bit shorter than the average human, have emerald-green eyes, and have a cat-like resemblance and antlers. They guard the Heart of Forest.
The second is the Elvik. They live in the mountains and their dark skin is as tough as diamond. They have fiery orange eyes and are said to have descended from the stone giants themselves. They guard the Heart of Stone.
The stone giants, the third race, are born of the mountain and named for the sounds rocks make when they collide. The only three still known to exist are young brothers, Mmrmr, Tktk, and Drrg. The landmass of the world was rumored to have been created when the great stone father died.
The fourth is the Salceans—the merfolk. They are nothing like traditional mermaids, though; they aren’t part fish. Their lower halves are similar to a dugong, and their upper halves resemble thick humans with golden hair and deep blue eyes. They were bred as a cross between humans and the deadly Zimwahar, the original merfolk (the fifth race). We see the Zimwahar in book two, but they’re not pretty. Their teeth alone would give you nightmares. The Salceans are said to guard the Heart of Sea.
The sixth race is the Tl’ys. These exotic, birdlike people are thin and pale with wide feathered wings and light-purple eyes. Their hair is either pure white or the deepest black, with no other shades between. They used to guard the Heart of Wind until the queen depleted its energy to maintain her and her son’s immortality. The Dark Prince is the ultimate antagonist in my story, hunting down the other heartsouls to keep himself alive.
The seventh is, of course, the humans. They couldn’t be trusted to guard a heartsoul, and for good reason. They are spread across the land, each village unique unto itself, and not all of them placing their belief in the world soul’s existence. They don’t even all believe in magic. The fate of the world soul depends on them, though, because it was a human witch who set everything in motion over two hundred years ago.
Anyway, that’s a crash-course on the worldbuilding of The World Soul. I wish I could give you a planned release date, but to be honest, when the first book is finished, I’ll be submitting it to agents and publishers in my quest for Tor.
But if you’d like to stay updated on my progress and my journey as a writer, you can follow me on Facebook at facebook.com/crystalmmburton and subscribe to my website at crystalmmburton.com. 
Thank you so much for having me today!
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Alright folks, it is that time again but I would like to say a heart felt thank you to Crystal MM Burton for sharing with us and spend some time in her world today. Keep your eyes on her.
Also, I would like to say a big thank you to the lovely readers out there for joining in and taking a moment to support your Authors.
If you or any of you know of someone who would like to be a part of Inside A Beautiful Mind, please send me a message.
Enjoy your Friday folks, you are awesome and please remember to be kind to your Authors, leave a review. See you in a couple of weeks, Peace.

Inside A Beautiful Mind – Rose Montague

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Good Morning Everyone and happy Friday

Welcome to Inside A Beautiful Mind.

Go grab your coffee, tea or beverage of choice and come sit with me as we get comfy and have a chat with the marvelous Rose Montague.

Good Morning Rose, thank you for agreeing to hang out with me this morning and being a part of Inside A Beautiful Mind.

So let’s get right to it, can you tell me a little bit about yourself.
My Goal: To have fun writing fun books to read.

My Writing Style: Not much pretty prose or flowery fluffiness, pretty much non-stop action and fun.

My Dream: To be able to write full time.

Reading Order: The chronological order is Jade, Jane, & Jill followed by the Norma Jean’sImage may contain: text School of Witchery series, Jewel and Ghost School. Jill bridges the gap between the Three J’Amigos and Norma Jean’s School of Witchery. The way I have written these books you can however, start with Jewel & Ghost School and then read the Three J’amigos series to get the back story on Jewel’s adoptive parents, Jade & Jane as well as her Godmother, Jill.

Tea or coffee?

Starting with the most important question! I start my day with hot coffee with cream and just a hint of chocolate. I end my day with iced tea and I prefer unsweetened green tea with lemon.

Through your writing career, what has been the toughest criticism given to you as an author? What has been the best compliment?

The toughest criticism has also been the best compliment! My main character has been called a Mary Sue. I have responded with a blog post called Embracing my Mary Sue. It’s who I am. It’s how I write. They are the characters I love.
http://fantasyfunreads.blogspot.com/…/embracing-my-mary-sue…

When you sit down to write, do you have any unique or quirky habits?

I have a bad back and it’s normal for me to wake up in the middle of the night. I find that quiet time to be the best time to write. My first book, Jade, was almost entirely written in the wee hours of the night.
Can you give us an interesting fun fact about your book?

The book I am working on now is a blend of urban fantasy and science fiction. It has magic and is also futuristic. I’m hoping for a summer release. Here’s the blurb:

“Hello. My name is Wiznewski James. I’m a real person but that’s not my real
name. My real name is GEM (Genetically Engineered Modification) Set 231
Batch 31,390. My sister is called Kate and she’s not a real person but that is the
real name I gave her. She’s an AI (Artificial Intelligence). She rides around with me
in my brain. Together we are on the run and hiding in plain sight. It was only a
matter of time before we ran into ConGlom again.

I’ve got the Genesis Egg and ComGlom wants it. I’m going to make sure they
don’t get their greedy hands on it. When they find out who I really am, they will want
me almost as bad as they want the device. I’ve decided to take a stand. It’s going
to be a real fight and they have no idea what they are getting into. They made me
and I will make them regret it. “

Would you mind telling us about your experiences in getting your first book published?

My first two books were published through a small press by the name of Eternal Press. They gave me my start and I will be forever grateful for that. Eventually they sold out to Image may contain: 2 people, texta new publisher and I eventually got the rights back to those two books. By that time I had self-published two other books so I ended up publishing new versions of the two originally traditional published books.

As an experienced writer, do you have any advice to give to aspiring writers?

Be prepared to sell and market your book. Make connections before publishing. Grow your base of friends and followers and be ready to sell right out the gate. Getting a few people to buy your book is a lot harder than you think, even if you go with a publisher.

How about sharing some of your book with us. Maybe a passage that will give us a glimpse into the world you built.

Excerpt from Norma jean’s School of Witchery, Book One: Jewel
“This a friend of yours, Wyatt?” his Mom shouted, looking like she was about to lose it.
“Yes, Mom,” he said, but he didn’t sound too happy about it. Nothing I could do, things were about to get worse.
I reached the house and went around the side of it, still flying, with the truck bouncing up and down and hit the edge of the woods, turning the lights off at the same time as I jerked the truck left, right, and left again, weaving between the trees I knew were there only from my gift. It was pitch-black dark in the woods. The only lights came from the dashboard. Limbs were slapping against the truck on both sides and the sound of small bushes we were running over scraped against the bottom of the truck. A loud snap and a crack appeared in the front window on the passenger side.
“Trust me, Wyatt,” I shouted above the noise and his Mom’s now also sobbing, pleading demands for me to stop.
“Her eyes are closed,” screamed his Mom. “We’re going to die!”

18922507_842660462550168_5922749885837755880_o

Teaser

A presidential election. A witch with a target on her back and a magical arrow. A shadowy government agency made up of witches with unusual abilities. A game called Witch Pong. The Mighty Thor?

See how it all comes together in a school you will never forget.

When did it dawn upon you that you wanted to be a writer?

I got my love of reading from my mother. I read what she read which was mostly suspense and romance. I discovered science fiction and fantasy on my own and fell in love with those genres. When I was young I wrote a few short stories and I had wanted to be a writer for a long time. Life interrupted and it would be four decades later when I wrote my first novel.

If any of you want to see what Rose is up to just follow these links:

https://www.amazon.com/Rose-Montague/e/B00GL9UPH2
https://twitter.com/RoseMontague/status/872000707439755266
https://books.pronoun.com/norma-jeans-school-of-witchery/
https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000712227923Image may contain: 1 person, text

 

Alright folks, it is that time again but I would like to say a heart felt thank you to Rose Montague for allowing us to see what she does and spend some time in her world today.

Also, I would like to say a big thank you to the lovely readers out there for joining in and taking a moment to support your Authors.
If you or any of you know of someone who would like to be a part of Inside A Beautiful Mind, please send me a message.
Enjoy your Friday folks, you are awesome and please remember to be kind to your Authors, leave a review. See you in a couple of weeks, Peace!!

CALICO (Book two of The Covenant of Shadows) in Beta mode

So after 2 ink cartridges and being rescued by my neighbor and her printer to print off the final 20 pages that my printer failed to do, CALICO is now on paper and out to my beautiful and talented graphic artist for the first read through. 18766802_1850105355310711_2744120594972578550_o

I am terrified but curious as to how she will react. Mostly terrified.

Then step two, it will be off to the next Beta reader for their input.  A scary but necessary measure in order to make sure I didn’t miss anything important in the manuscript before sending it off to my wonderful editor.

Anywho, it is a huge accomplishment for me to get it out of my head and onto paper. AND I just like holding it in my hands…cause it feels AWESOME.  haha

Alright.. that is it for updates. Big hugs and bigger dreams 🙂

Inside A Beautiful Mind – E.P. Wyck

 

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Good Morning Everyone and happy Friday

Welcome to Inside A Beautiful Mind.

Go grab your coffee, tea or beverage of choice and come sit with me as we get comfy and have a chat with the talented E.P Wyck.

Good Morning, thank you for agreeing to hang out with me and wanting to be a part of Inside A Beautiful Mind.

So let’s get right to it, can you tell me a little bit about yourself.untitled.png

I am writing under the Pen Name, E.P. Wyck. I decided to use a pen name in order to maintain the privacy of my family as I hopefully rise to meteoric fame. The E does stand for my first name Evan, so please call me Evan. I am budding author in Sci-Fi. My current series has some elements of fantasy and space opera. I know what you’re thinking. Those genres do go well together. I thought so too.
I’ve recently moved from upstate New York to the middle of nowhere Oklahoma. I have been married for nearly 12 years. My wife and I have two children, two dogs, and two fish. I am sure I could go on, but I think a lot of what I’d say will be answered below.
What are your tastes: Sweet or Salty?
Yes please!
Tea or coffee?
I don’t drink either.
Can you give us an interesting fun fact about your book?
I mentioned the book is Sci-Fi with some fantasy and space opera elements. To elaborate the series follows a species of winged beings through a tumultuous time where the main character set out on a journey to a black hole to determine if they can manipulate time.
How about sharing some of your book with us. Maybe a passage that will give us a glimpse into the world you built.
This passage follows two characters on their way into Tresopolis, the Capitol city of the Trinity Space Alliance: Ryn and Kali flew the rest of way taking in the city. An ancient Ascendant city which became the new Capitol of the alliance after the signing of the treaty. New construction overshadowed old stone buildings. They landed at the entrance of the Capitol building, a gigantic obelisk that dwarfed every other building on the planet.
A common misconception entwined with authors is that they are socially inept, how true is that?
I have noticed that a lot of your questions talk about stereotypes and writing. I am not sure why we should perpetuate them. Often times stereotypes are what lead to those misconceptions. Someone will see a prominent person do something and think all of whoever they’re associated with is like that. Which is rarely case.
Do all authors have to be grammar Nazis?
I think that authors often time may not have a strong working knowledge of grammar when they set out to be authors. Over time they develop that knowledge either by research or repetition while working with an editor. I believe it is the editor’s responsibility to be the grammar police.
If you could have been the original author of any book, what would it have been and why?
H.G. Wells and his work The Time Machine. I believe that his idea of time truly defied then scientific standards. He put together a work of fiction that not only captivated audiences in his time, but has continued to define a genre today.
How important is research to you when writing a book?
Paramount. I think especially in Sci-Fi, readers want the story to be as believable as possible. All readers want to be enveloped by the story they’re reading. However, with Sci-Fi, you have technology or laws of physics that are outside the realm of what we scientifically know to be possible. So when I develop a method to manipulate time, travel faster than light speed, or teleport; I have to do that as realistically as possible. Sure there is some stretching of the truth or strategic use of make believe to blend science fact with science fiction, but I think the better versed I am in whatever I am trying to make up the better the story is for it.
What works best for you: Typewriters, fountain pen, dictate, computer or longhand?
I am completely digital. I use a MacBook, an iPad Pro and my iPhone. I mostly use Ulysses to write. For planning I use Aeon Timeline.
When did it dawn upon you that you wanted to be a writer?
About four years ago I got this idea that something would make a cool story. I decided to open the notes app on my iPhone and entered the idea. Next thing I know every time I had another idea I put it in the note. After several years I had this amalgamation of plot twists, character names, story ideas, technology ideas, weapons, settings, and more. For a few years I had been mulling over a career change. While talking with a friend of mine I mentioned that among other things I had thought about writing a book. I explained I knew it would take time to develop a platform to rely on writing as my sole source of income. My friend said, why not start now? He said you have a job, your bills are paid and you can work on it without having to worry where your next meal will come from. That was the moment I decided to start writing.
What inspires you to write?
Ideas. So many ideas I want to see transformed into stories.
How often do you write?
As often as possible.
Do you have a set schedule for writing, or are you one of those who write only when they feel inspired?
If you only write when you’re inspired you’re doing it wrong. Sure, everybody has a bad day. However, if you want to be successful you need to write when you’re happy, sad, in love, broken hearted, well rested, tired, and everything else. Why? Because you will probably be able to harness some of that. Maybe you won’t be able to use it that day, but you’ll learn something about yourself. You’ll tap into something and learn how to get back there. One day you’re going to have a hard time writing a scene and if you write enough, chances are you will write something that you can use when you come to that difficult scene.
How hard was it to sit down and actually start writing something?
The hardest part was writing and not going, “that sucks!” Then immediately giving up. Thankfully, I took a little time to research writing/authoring before I started working on my novel. I knew that no matter what I wrote I would think it was terrible. It didn’t matter if it was my first draft or my millionth. Once I came to terms with that, I found putting the words down to be rather easy.
Do you aim to complete a set number of pages or words each day?
Daily goals are so relative. During NaNoWriMo they say you should write 1,667 words per day. What if you want to write 100,000 words? 1,667 words per day will not do. For me I set my goals based on my deadlines. For example if I want to write 10,000 words by Sunday and it is Friday, I will write my heart out Friday and then take what is left and divide it between Saturday and Sunday. Sometimes I am editing so I don’t have a daily goal of writing in mind.
Do you think writers have a normal life like others?
Normal is so relative. In the 1980s they made a move about nerds and how they were so uncool. Now it is rather chic to be a nerd or geek. I believe if an author is doing it right, they have a schedule and they stick to it. They write when the need to write, the relax when they need to relax, and so on.
Do you set a plot or prefer going wherever an idea takes you?
Pantser or plotter, I’d say almost every author is a hybrid of the two. Some lean more towards pantsing and others more to plotting, but every author will chase the story as it is flowing out of them. Some reign it in more and keep to that outline others change their outline and keep going. Also even pantsers will plan some stuff even if it is just an idea in their head. For me I am very plot heavy but I often find myself going, “Ooooooh, it’d be so epic if….”.
What, according to you, is the hardest thing about writing? 18318614_284306232013334_1922912156_o
Killing my darlings, those things that as an author I think they’re crucial to the story but in fact they may not even be relevant. It could be a prologue, a character, some exposition. However the darling appears it is always a tough thing for me cut.
Have you ever left any of your books stew for months on end or even a year? – The longest time I let a novel rest was 45 days.
How would you feel if no one showed up at your book signing?
That hopefully they’re too busy reading to attend.
Do you read and reply to the reviews and comments of your readers?
As often as possible.
Does a bad review affect your writing?
Bad is so relative. If a reviewer says something isn’t up to par and provide me with a way to enhance my writing then that isn’t a bad review. I believe everything is a learning experience.
Any advice you would like to give to aspiring writers?
Don’t wait. Start writing now.
Which book inspired you to begin writing?
Not so much a book as a series. The Spinward Fringe Series by Randolph Lalonde. Fantastic series and Mr. Lalonde’s own journey from writer to author inspired me as well.
It is often believed that almost all writers have had their hearts broken at some point in time, does that remain true for you as well?
I have noticed that a lot of your questions talk about stereotypes and writing. I am not sure why we should perpetuate them. Often times stereotypes are what lead to those misconceptions. Someone will see a prominent person do something and think all of whoever they’re associated with is like that. Which is rarely case.
Who is the most supportive of your writing in your family?
Without question my wife. She is often like my writing boss. She will ask, “What is that?” I’ll respond, “It is (whatever).” Then she says, “That’s not writing your book. Write!” Without her I don’t think I’d ever get anywhere with my manuscripts.
Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
Scope. The sheer scope of it. I put a lot of effort into timeline of the book to make sure that over multiple books I had precise continuity. I couldn’t let the book just meander about. I needed to know where it started, where it went and how it got there. Additionally, I have a very large cast of characters. I’ve created a whole brand new universe, this further expands the scope.
Writers are often believed to have a Muse, your thoughts on that?
I think everybody regardless if they write or not have a muse in someway. It may be a child that keeps a tired parent going to work day in and day out. It could be the new shiny gadget somebody is saving for. Or it could be the inspiration to a story.
Poets and writers in general, have a reputation of committing suicide; in your opinion, why is that the case?
I have noticed that a lot of your questions talk about stereotypes and writing. I am not sure why we should perpetuate them. Often times stereotypes are what lead to those misconceptions. Someone will see a prominent person do something and think all of whoever they’re associated with is like that. Which is rarely case.
Another misconception is that all writers are independently wealthy, how true is that?
I have noticed that a lot of your questions talk about stereotypes and writing. I am not sure why we should perpetuate them. Often times stereotypes are what lead to those misconceptions. Someone will see a prominent person do something and think all of whoever they’re associated with is like that. Which is rarely case.
From all that we have been hearing and seeing in the movies, most writers are alcoholics. Your views on that?
I have noticed that a lot of your questions talk about stereotypes and writing. I am not sure why we should perpetuate them. Often times stereotypes are what lead to those misconceptions. Someone will see a prominent person do something and think all of whoever they’re associated with is like that. Which is rarely case.
Is it true that anyone can be a writer?
I believe that anybody who wants to put the work in could achieve anything they way. However, that doesn’t mean they will. The world is a tough place. Not everybody is going to be an author. Just like not everybody will be a doctor. If you want to be a writer, then write. Congratulations you’re a writer.
People believe that being a published author is glamorous, is that true?
I think published is so relative. Today anyone can put their words into a file and send it to Amazon, Smashwords, iBooks, et al and your work is published. If you mean a traditionally published author who queried an agent, then publishers, then signed contracts and have agreed to exclusively publish through a single publisher, then no. I believe authors give up a lot freedom when they do that. If I want to write only one book this year but it is going to be the best book of the century, then I want the freedom to slow my schedule down and put the effort in. However, a publisher may want me to write at least three books a year. Also, what if I want to publish ten books this year but the publisher isn’t willing to publish so many they want to milk the market and release them slower. ….
Do you like traveling or do you prefer staying indoors?
I do love traveling, but truth be told I am a homebody.
Is it true that authors write word-perfect first drafts?
No. I don’t think any writer, no matter how skilled writes a perfect first draft. By definition perfect means nothing about it could be improved. However, everything can always be improved. Truth be told, every first draft sucks. That’s ok though. It is our job as authors to get the story on the page. From there we polish into the best version of that story of which we are capable. I like to think of it like this, aim for perfection but settle for excellence along the way.
Did any of your books get rejected by publishers?
I plan to stay Independent.
How does it feel when you don’t get the recognition you deserve?
Deserve? Who said I deserve anything? If I write my heart out and put the best book I can out, and somebody else writes a better story then they deserve the recognition.
Do you reply back to your fans and admirers personally?
Of course.
They say books die every time they are turned into a movie; what do you think?
I think it depends, different adaptations have more/less success being “true to the book”.
Whose work do you enjoy reading the most?
Without question, Randolph Lalonde.
Have you ever taken any help from other writers?
Absolutely. I am on a few Facebook groups which are authors helping authors. I also have a Skype group chat that is several authors and we always kick ideas around or help patch plot holes.
Do you make your own vocabulary words in your book or resort to the existing ones?
I have created a completely new universe and I definitely have some made up words.
What is that one thing you think readers generally don’t know about your specific genre?
I think most people don’t read Sci-Fi because they think it is all technobabble and nerdy stuff, which is completely untrue. Great Sci-Fi, just like any great book will transport you to a wonderful world in your imagination. Maybe it doesn’t have erotica, or werewolves, but chances are if you’ve watched a movie set in the future or space and you enjoyed it, you may like Sci-Fi. Give it a chance.
Is writing book series more challenging?
Honestly, I think trying to write a single book would be harder because I’d be limited. Working on this series I constantly come up with new ideas. If I had to limit my work to a single book I’d probably have to cut some of those great ideas.
Writers are permanently depressed; how true is that?
I have noticed that a lot of your questions talk about stereotypes and writing. I am not sure why we should perpetuate them. Often times stereotypes are what lead to those misconceptions. Someone will see a prominent person do something and think all of whoever they’re associated with is like that. Which is rarely case.
Did the thought to give up writing ever occur to you?
Yes. I was around 50,000 words into writing and I wasn’t happy with where it was going. I felt like I wasn’t getting anywhere with the book. I know statistically speaking my chance of being the next celebrity author is slim to none. I figured why keep putting so much effort into something that will yield so little fruit. Long story short I shared my feelings with some friends and they encouraged me. I held onto the idea of quitting it for a few weeks, maybe a month. Finally, I got back into it and I haven’t looked back since.
What advice would you like to give writers who are struggling with their first novels?
There are a lot of articles, blog posts and etc about this. I ask you this: Did you give up the first time you tried to walk, speak your native language, etc No. So don’t give up.
Do you think you still have a story to tell to the readers?
Remember the answer about “scope”? I have lots of story to tell. Ask me again in a few years.
Do writers become narcissists once their book starts to sell?
I think success does different things to different people. Some people are born humble and stay humble, others are born humble and become arrogant.
Do you pen down revelations and ideas as you get them, right then and there?
I try to.
Although all books say that all the characters in the book aren’t real or related, but are they really all fictional and made up?
I think inspiration comes in many forms and they say that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery… For my books inspiration came from many places. I hope if anybody ever correctly deduces they were my inspiration they find my imitation very flattering.
Have you ever written a character based on the real you in some part?
Oh yeah. I can’t tell you which one though…
Can you tell us about your current projects?
I initially started working on what is now book 3 of this series. When I set down to write it I hoped it would blossom into a series. Before I could finish it I knew I needed to nail down the background of the story because I wanted the continuity. I decided to go back and write what is now Book 1. With that being said the books are set in the Empyrean Universe. A research scientist is on the brink of discovering the key to manipulating time. However, he discovers the leadership of his government may not have their citizens’ best interest in mind.
When can the readers expect your next book in print?
I don’t know if I will ever print a book. I know some readers enjoy having a printed copy in their hands, but I don’t know if the revenue would be worth the cost of production for an independent author.
Did you ever change sentences more than five times just because it didn’t hit the right notes?
When I first started writing I’d mull over every word I wrote. I didn’t understand that my first draft is just putting sand in the sandbox. During revision and editing that is when I will turn that sand into beautiful sand castles.
Ever learned anything thing from a negative review and incorporated it in your writing?
From the question about a bad review: If a reviewer says something isn’t up to par and provide me with a way to enhance my writing then that isn’t a bad review. I believe everything is a learning experience. I have found that writing is a lot like Goldilocks and the Three Bears. There is too hot (much), too cold (little) and just right while writing description, exposition, and many other elements of a story. I have dubbed this process as finding the Goldilocks Zone.
Did you ever have a rough patch in writing, where nothing in the story seemed to fit or make sense?
See the question about quitting above: Yes. I was around 50,000 words into writing and I wasn’t happy with where it was going. I felt like I wasn’t getting anywhere with the book. I know statistically speaking my chance of being the next celebrity author is slim to none. I figured why keep putting so much effort into something that will yield so little fruit. Long story short I shared my feelings with some friends and they encouraged me. I held onto the idea of quitting it for a few weeks, maybe a month. Finally, I got back into it and I haven’t looked back since.
You don’t have to be a writer in order to be an author – how true is that?
I think it may be the other way around. You don’t have to be an author to be a writer. What I mean is to put your thoughts, stories, or ideas to paper you don’t have to have a degree in English or creative writing. You don’t need an agent or publisher. You just need something write with. It could be a pen, pencil, computer, typewriter, or something else. If you want to write, or even publish something, you only need to start.
Are you friends with any of your contemporaries? If yes, do you discuss your current projects with each other?
During NaNoWriMo2016 (National Novel Writing Month) I took to Twitter to do word sprints or word wars. A group of people started banding together and cheering each other on. After a few days all of the names in the message made it all but impossible to communicate anything. We decided to start a Skype group chat. On more than one occasion the members of that chat, myself included, have asked for help. Maybe a character needs developed, or a plot hole filled. Any number of things really. In addition to that I have three people I turn to all the time to ask questions about my story. It could be a plot twist I am thinking of or a new piece of made up tech. I believe when authors help each other they’re investing their craft.
How big of a part does music play in creating your “zone”?
I prefer to write in silence. Most of the time my family is around. In that case I use a nice pair of wireless headphones playing loud music to drown out any possible distractors. Additionally, I have curated playlists to help adjust my mood for particular scenes. I would say that music is very important to my writing.
Do you need to be in a specific place or room to write, or you can just sit in the middle of a café full of people and write?
I have taken over my wife’s old desk. She used to be big into scrapbooking and digital photography. However she has moved on from that hobby. Her desk became a catch all for, well, all. After writing on the couch for about two months I decided to clean up the desk and use it. Since then I have done most of my writing at the desk. However, I have been known to take my iPad or Mac with me and write anywhere.
Writers usually have a particular Muse, but some also have a different Muse which inspired different books – does that apply in your case?
I touched on this in another answer. I would say muses can inspire something as little as a name, to as much as the whole series. I personally, have multiple muses that influence lots of aspects of my series.
What advice would you like to pass on to young writers of today that is unconventional but true?
Don’t accept the status quo. So many people will tell you that writing isn’t a “real career” and that writers don’t make money. When they tell you that remind them that they told you to be anything you wanted. Of course, be a functioning member of society, but also chase that dream.
Which genre of book do you think should be most adopted for kids in school? – A big push in most schools is STEM programs. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math are all cornerstones of Sci-Fi. Sure, don’t teach kids fiction but give them something to enjoy learning. Like I said, I aim for my books to be as close to the truth as possible. I am sure there could be fiction books which cover STEM topics in a realistic and engaging way.
Is today’s generation more aware of the literary art or less?
I think much less. I think with few exceptions today most children don’t read anything they’re not required to read by a school’s curriculum and that is probably stretching it. Go to a busy mall on the weekend. Look at kids, they’re not reading books. They’re playing games. They’re taking selfies. Even just a decade ago you could go to a coffee shop and half of the people there were curled up with a book. Now you just see people come and go. If they stay they’re only there to use free wifi to connect on social media.
If you’re writing about a city/country/culture you haven’t physically visited, how much research do you conduct before you start writing?
I am writing about a whole universe that is completely make believe. However, this universe has a lot of the same laws of physics as ours. So I have done tons of research to make it believable as possible.
What are your views about elaborate synopsis of books at the back of the cover? Do you think they reveal too much?
I think that largely depends. Sometimes books are complex and you need to peel the onion back to really pique that interest. Other times you could say everything a prospective readers needs to know in a few words.

How possessive are you about your work?
I am very possessive. I worry constantly that somebody will take an idea I had and try to one up my book. Also, I don’t trust many people with the macro elements of my plot. However, I am rather willing to get the book into the wild and let the world enjoy the story.
Do you encourage your children to read?
Absolutely. My daughter loves to read. She only asks for books for presents. My son however, he doesn’t read as much but we do our best to find books that engage him. We insist he reads every day.
Do you enjoy discussing upcoming ideas with your partner? If yes, how much do you value their inputs?
My wife is a voracious reader, however she doesn’t particularly like Sci-Fi. With that being said I have a few people I’ve grown close to that I really enjoy going through my ideas with. We discuss plot holes, or continuity, or what if so-and-so did such-and-such…
Have you ever turned a dream or a nightmare into a written piece?
What writer hasn’t? I tend to dream more about my made up world when I have been writing for days on end. This is usually when I will get an interesting plot twist. Also, I have had dreams that weren’t related to my book that I thought would be interesting.
How long do you take to write a book?
I haven’t quite normalized my process yet. For my first book it took me about four months to write 57,000 words. My most recent book I wrote 65,000 words in 13 days. The biggest difference I planned my writing for about three weeks on my most recent book. I think that really sped up the process. I am hoping to get into a rhythm where I can write a book in about six to eight weeks.
Do you blog?
Yes, please have a look www.epwyck.wordpress.com
How active are you on social media? And how do you think it affects the way you write?
I try to be very active but I think that can often cause issues with focus while trying to write. I am regularly on Facebook and Twitter. I have an Instagram and Pinterest.

Alright folks, it is that time again but I would like to say a heart felt thank you to E.P. Wyck for allowing us to see what makes him tick.
Also, I would like to say a big thank you to the lovely readers out there for joining in and taking a moment to support your Authors.
If you or any of you know of someone who would like to be a part of Inside A Beautiful Mind, please send me a message.
Enjoy your Friday folks, you are awesome and please remember to be kind to your Authors, leave a review. See you in a couple of weeks, Peace!!

EP Wyck, E.P. Wyck, NaNoWriMo, #NaNoWriMo, Writing, Author, SciFi, Space Opera
epwyck.wordpress.com
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