Inside A Beautiful Mind – E.P. Wyck

 

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Good Morning Everyone and happy Friday

Welcome to Inside A Beautiful Mind.

Go grab your coffee, tea or beverage of choice and come sit with me as we get comfy and have a chat with the talented E.P Wyck.

Good Morning, thank you for agreeing to hang out with me and wanting to be a part of Inside A Beautiful Mind.

So let’s get right to it, can you tell me a little bit about yourself.untitled.png

I am writing under the Pen Name, E.P. Wyck. I decided to use a pen name in order to maintain the privacy of my family as I hopefully rise to meteoric fame. The E does stand for my first name Evan, so please call me Evan. I am budding author in Sci-Fi. My current series has some elements of fantasy and space opera. I know what you’re thinking. Those genres do go well together. I thought so too.
I’ve recently moved from upstate New York to the middle of nowhere Oklahoma. I have been married for nearly 12 years. My wife and I have two children, two dogs, and two fish. I am sure I could go on, but I think a lot of what I’d say will be answered below.
What are your tastes: Sweet or Salty?
Yes please!
Tea or coffee?
I don’t drink either.
Can you give us an interesting fun fact about your book?
I mentioned the book is Sci-Fi with some fantasy and space opera elements. To elaborate the series follows a species of winged beings through a tumultuous time where the main character set out on a journey to a black hole to determine if they can manipulate time.
How about sharing some of your book with us. Maybe a passage that will give us a glimpse into the world you built.
This passage follows two characters on their way into Tresopolis, the Capitol city of the Trinity Space Alliance: Ryn and Kali flew the rest of way taking in the city. An ancient Ascendant city which became the new Capitol of the alliance after the signing of the treaty. New construction overshadowed old stone buildings. They landed at the entrance of the Capitol building, a gigantic obelisk that dwarfed every other building on the planet.
A common misconception entwined with authors is that they are socially inept, how true is that?
I have noticed that a lot of your questions talk about stereotypes and writing. I am not sure why we should perpetuate them. Often times stereotypes are what lead to those misconceptions. Someone will see a prominent person do something and think all of whoever they’re associated with is like that. Which is rarely case.
Do all authors have to be grammar Nazis?
I think that authors often time may not have a strong working knowledge of grammar when they set out to be authors. Over time they develop that knowledge either by research or repetition while working with an editor. I believe it is the editor’s responsibility to be the grammar police.
If you could have been the original author of any book, what would it have been and why?
H.G. Wells and his work The Time Machine. I believe that his idea of time truly defied then scientific standards. He put together a work of fiction that not only captivated audiences in his time, but has continued to define a genre today.
How important is research to you when writing a book?
Paramount. I think especially in Sci-Fi, readers want the story to be as believable as possible. All readers want to be enveloped by the story they’re reading. However, with Sci-Fi, you have technology or laws of physics that are outside the realm of what we scientifically know to be possible. So when I develop a method to manipulate time, travel faster than light speed, or teleport; I have to do that as realistically as possible. Sure there is some stretching of the truth or strategic use of make believe to blend science fact with science fiction, but I think the better versed I am in whatever I am trying to make up the better the story is for it.
What works best for you: Typewriters, fountain pen, dictate, computer or longhand?
I am completely digital. I use a MacBook, an iPad Pro and my iPhone. I mostly use Ulysses to write. For planning I use Aeon Timeline.
When did it dawn upon you that you wanted to be a writer?
About four years ago I got this idea that something would make a cool story. I decided to open the notes app on my iPhone and entered the idea. Next thing I know every time I had another idea I put it in the note. After several years I had this amalgamation of plot twists, character names, story ideas, technology ideas, weapons, settings, and more. For a few years I had been mulling over a career change. While talking with a friend of mine I mentioned that among other things I had thought about writing a book. I explained I knew it would take time to develop a platform to rely on writing as my sole source of income. My friend said, why not start now? He said you have a job, your bills are paid and you can work on it without having to worry where your next meal will come from. That was the moment I decided to start writing.
What inspires you to write?
Ideas. So many ideas I want to see transformed into stories.
How often do you write?
As often as possible.
Do you have a set schedule for writing, or are you one of those who write only when they feel inspired?
If you only write when you’re inspired you’re doing it wrong. Sure, everybody has a bad day. However, if you want to be successful you need to write when you’re happy, sad, in love, broken hearted, well rested, tired, and everything else. Why? Because you will probably be able to harness some of that. Maybe you won’t be able to use it that day, but you’ll learn something about yourself. You’ll tap into something and learn how to get back there. One day you’re going to have a hard time writing a scene and if you write enough, chances are you will write something that you can use when you come to that difficult scene.
How hard was it to sit down and actually start writing something?
The hardest part was writing and not going, “that sucks!” Then immediately giving up. Thankfully, I took a little time to research writing/authoring before I started working on my novel. I knew that no matter what I wrote I would think it was terrible. It didn’t matter if it was my first draft or my millionth. Once I came to terms with that, I found putting the words down to be rather easy.
Do you aim to complete a set number of pages or words each day?
Daily goals are so relative. During NaNoWriMo they say you should write 1,667 words per day. What if you want to write 100,000 words? 1,667 words per day will not do. For me I set my goals based on my deadlines. For example if I want to write 10,000 words by Sunday and it is Friday, I will write my heart out Friday and then take what is left and divide it between Saturday and Sunday. Sometimes I am editing so I don’t have a daily goal of writing in mind.
Do you think writers have a normal life like others?
Normal is so relative. In the 1980s they made a move about nerds and how they were so uncool. Now it is rather chic to be a nerd or geek. I believe if an author is doing it right, they have a schedule and they stick to it. They write when the need to write, the relax when they need to relax, and so on.
Do you set a plot or prefer going wherever an idea takes you?
Pantser or plotter, I’d say almost every author is a hybrid of the two. Some lean more towards pantsing and others more to plotting, but every author will chase the story as it is flowing out of them. Some reign it in more and keep to that outline others change their outline and keep going. Also even pantsers will plan some stuff even if it is just an idea in their head. For me I am very plot heavy but I often find myself going, “Ooooooh, it’d be so epic if….”.
What, according to you, is the hardest thing about writing? 18318614_284306232013334_1922912156_o
Killing my darlings, those things that as an author I think they’re crucial to the story but in fact they may not even be relevant. It could be a prologue, a character, some exposition. However the darling appears it is always a tough thing for me cut.
Have you ever left any of your books stew for months on end or even a year? – The longest time I let a novel rest was 45 days.
How would you feel if no one showed up at your book signing?
That hopefully they’re too busy reading to attend.
Do you read and reply to the reviews and comments of your readers?
As often as possible.
Does a bad review affect your writing?
Bad is so relative. If a reviewer says something isn’t up to par and provide me with a way to enhance my writing then that isn’t a bad review. I believe everything is a learning experience.
Any advice you would like to give to aspiring writers?
Don’t wait. Start writing now.
Which book inspired you to begin writing?
Not so much a book as a series. The Spinward Fringe Series by Randolph Lalonde. Fantastic series and Mr. Lalonde’s own journey from writer to author inspired me as well.
It is often believed that almost all writers have had their hearts broken at some point in time, does that remain true for you as well?
I have noticed that a lot of your questions talk about stereotypes and writing. I am not sure why we should perpetuate them. Often times stereotypes are what lead to those misconceptions. Someone will see a prominent person do something and think all of whoever they’re associated with is like that. Which is rarely case.
Who is the most supportive of your writing in your family?
Without question my wife. She is often like my writing boss. She will ask, “What is that?” I’ll respond, “It is (whatever).” Then she says, “That’s not writing your book. Write!” Without her I don’t think I’d ever get anywhere with my manuscripts.
Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
Scope. The sheer scope of it. I put a lot of effort into timeline of the book to make sure that over multiple books I had precise continuity. I couldn’t let the book just meander about. I needed to know where it started, where it went and how it got there. Additionally, I have a very large cast of characters. I’ve created a whole brand new universe, this further expands the scope.
Writers are often believed to have a Muse, your thoughts on that?
I think everybody regardless if they write or not have a muse in someway. It may be a child that keeps a tired parent going to work day in and day out. It could be the new shiny gadget somebody is saving for. Or it could be the inspiration to a story.
Poets and writers in general, have a reputation of committing suicide; in your opinion, why is that the case?
I have noticed that a lot of your questions talk about stereotypes and writing. I am not sure why we should perpetuate them. Often times stereotypes are what lead to those misconceptions. Someone will see a prominent person do something and think all of whoever they’re associated with is like that. Which is rarely case.
Another misconception is that all writers are independently wealthy, how true is that?
I have noticed that a lot of your questions talk about stereotypes and writing. I am not sure why we should perpetuate them. Often times stereotypes are what lead to those misconceptions. Someone will see a prominent person do something and think all of whoever they’re associated with is like that. Which is rarely case.
From all that we have been hearing and seeing in the movies, most writers are alcoholics. Your views on that?
I have noticed that a lot of your questions talk about stereotypes and writing. I am not sure why we should perpetuate them. Often times stereotypes are what lead to those misconceptions. Someone will see a prominent person do something and think all of whoever they’re associated with is like that. Which is rarely case.
Is it true that anyone can be a writer?
I believe that anybody who wants to put the work in could achieve anything they way. However, that doesn’t mean they will. The world is a tough place. Not everybody is going to be an author. Just like not everybody will be a doctor. If you want to be a writer, then write. Congratulations you’re a writer.
People believe that being a published author is glamorous, is that true?
I think published is so relative. Today anyone can put their words into a file and send it to Amazon, Smashwords, iBooks, et al and your work is published. If you mean a traditionally published author who queried an agent, then publishers, then signed contracts and have agreed to exclusively publish through a single publisher, then no. I believe authors give up a lot freedom when they do that. If I want to write only one book this year but it is going to be the best book of the century, then I want the freedom to slow my schedule down and put the effort in. However, a publisher may want me to write at least three books a year. Also, what if I want to publish ten books this year but the publisher isn’t willing to publish so many they want to milk the market and release them slower. ….
Do you like traveling or do you prefer staying indoors?
I do love traveling, but truth be told I am a homebody.
Is it true that authors write word-perfect first drafts?
No. I don’t think any writer, no matter how skilled writes a perfect first draft. By definition perfect means nothing about it could be improved. However, everything can always be improved. Truth be told, every first draft sucks. That’s ok though. It is our job as authors to get the story on the page. From there we polish into the best version of that story of which we are capable. I like to think of it like this, aim for perfection but settle for excellence along the way.
Did any of your books get rejected by publishers?
I plan to stay Independent.
How does it feel when you don’t get the recognition you deserve?
Deserve? Who said I deserve anything? If I write my heart out and put the best book I can out, and somebody else writes a better story then they deserve the recognition.
Do you reply back to your fans and admirers personally?
Of course.
They say books die every time they are turned into a movie; what do you think?
I think it depends, different adaptations have more/less success being “true to the book”.
Whose work do you enjoy reading the most?
Without question, Randolph Lalonde.
Have you ever taken any help from other writers?
Absolutely. I am on a few Facebook groups which are authors helping authors. I also have a Skype group chat that is several authors and we always kick ideas around or help patch plot holes.
Do you make your own vocabulary words in your book or resort to the existing ones?
I have created a completely new universe and I definitely have some made up words.
What is that one thing you think readers generally don’t know about your specific genre?
I think most people don’t read Sci-Fi because they think it is all technobabble and nerdy stuff, which is completely untrue. Great Sci-Fi, just like any great book will transport you to a wonderful world in your imagination. Maybe it doesn’t have erotica, or werewolves, but chances are if you’ve watched a movie set in the future or space and you enjoyed it, you may like Sci-Fi. Give it a chance.
Is writing book series more challenging?
Honestly, I think trying to write a single book would be harder because I’d be limited. Working on this series I constantly come up with new ideas. If I had to limit my work to a single book I’d probably have to cut some of those great ideas.
Writers are permanently depressed; how true is that?
I have noticed that a lot of your questions talk about stereotypes and writing. I am not sure why we should perpetuate them. Often times stereotypes are what lead to those misconceptions. Someone will see a prominent person do something and think all of whoever they’re associated with is like that. Which is rarely case.
Did the thought to give up writing ever occur to you?
Yes. I was around 50,000 words into writing and I wasn’t happy with where it was going. I felt like I wasn’t getting anywhere with the book. I know statistically speaking my chance of being the next celebrity author is slim to none. I figured why keep putting so much effort into something that will yield so little fruit. Long story short I shared my feelings with some friends and they encouraged me. I held onto the idea of quitting it for a few weeks, maybe a month. Finally, I got back into it and I haven’t looked back since.
What advice would you like to give writers who are struggling with their first novels?
There are a lot of articles, blog posts and etc about this. I ask you this: Did you give up the first time you tried to walk, speak your native language, etc No. So don’t give up.
Do you think you still have a story to tell to the readers?
Remember the answer about “scope”? I have lots of story to tell. Ask me again in a few years.
Do writers become narcissists once their book starts to sell?
I think success does different things to different people. Some people are born humble and stay humble, others are born humble and become arrogant.
Do you pen down revelations and ideas as you get them, right then and there?
I try to.
Although all books say that all the characters in the book aren’t real or related, but are they really all fictional and made up?
I think inspiration comes in many forms and they say that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery… For my books inspiration came from many places. I hope if anybody ever correctly deduces they were my inspiration they find my imitation very flattering.
Have you ever written a character based on the real you in some part?
Oh yeah. I can’t tell you which one though…
Can you tell us about your current projects?
I initially started working on what is now book 3 of this series. When I set down to write it I hoped it would blossom into a series. Before I could finish it I knew I needed to nail down the background of the story because I wanted the continuity. I decided to go back and write what is now Book 1. With that being said the books are set in the Empyrean Universe. A research scientist is on the brink of discovering the key to manipulating time. However, he discovers the leadership of his government may not have their citizens’ best interest in mind.
When can the readers expect your next book in print?
I don’t know if I will ever print a book. I know some readers enjoy having a printed copy in their hands, but I don’t know if the revenue would be worth the cost of production for an independent author.
Did you ever change sentences more than five times just because it didn’t hit the right notes?
When I first started writing I’d mull over every word I wrote. I didn’t understand that my first draft is just putting sand in the sandbox. During revision and editing that is when I will turn that sand into beautiful sand castles.
Ever learned anything thing from a negative review and incorporated it in your writing?
From the question about a bad review: If a reviewer says something isn’t up to par and provide me with a way to enhance my writing then that isn’t a bad review. I believe everything is a learning experience. I have found that writing is a lot like Goldilocks and the Three Bears. There is too hot (much), too cold (little) and just right while writing description, exposition, and many other elements of a story. I have dubbed this process as finding the Goldilocks Zone.
Did you ever have a rough patch in writing, where nothing in the story seemed to fit or make sense?
See the question about quitting above: Yes. I was around 50,000 words into writing and I wasn’t happy with where it was going. I felt like I wasn’t getting anywhere with the book. I know statistically speaking my chance of being the next celebrity author is slim to none. I figured why keep putting so much effort into something that will yield so little fruit. Long story short I shared my feelings with some friends and they encouraged me. I held onto the idea of quitting it for a few weeks, maybe a month. Finally, I got back into it and I haven’t looked back since.
You don’t have to be a writer in order to be an author – how true is that?
I think it may be the other way around. You don’t have to be an author to be a writer. What I mean is to put your thoughts, stories, or ideas to paper you don’t have to have a degree in English or creative writing. You don’t need an agent or publisher. You just need something write with. It could be a pen, pencil, computer, typewriter, or something else. If you want to write, or even publish something, you only need to start.
Are you friends with any of your contemporaries? If yes, do you discuss your current projects with each other?
During NaNoWriMo2016 (National Novel Writing Month) I took to Twitter to do word sprints or word wars. A group of people started banding together and cheering each other on. After a few days all of the names in the message made it all but impossible to communicate anything. We decided to start a Skype group chat. On more than one occasion the members of that chat, myself included, have asked for help. Maybe a character needs developed, or a plot hole filled. Any number of things really. In addition to that I have three people I turn to all the time to ask questions about my story. It could be a plot twist I am thinking of or a new piece of made up tech. I believe when authors help each other they’re investing their craft.
How big of a part does music play in creating your “zone”?
I prefer to write in silence. Most of the time my family is around. In that case I use a nice pair of wireless headphones playing loud music to drown out any possible distractors. Additionally, I have curated playlists to help adjust my mood for particular scenes. I would say that music is very important to my writing.
Do you need to be in a specific place or room to write, or you can just sit in the middle of a café full of people and write?
I have taken over my wife’s old desk. She used to be big into scrapbooking and digital photography. However she has moved on from that hobby. Her desk became a catch all for, well, all. After writing on the couch for about two months I decided to clean up the desk and use it. Since then I have done most of my writing at the desk. However, I have been known to take my iPad or Mac with me and write anywhere.
Writers usually have a particular Muse, but some also have a different Muse which inspired different books – does that apply in your case?
I touched on this in another answer. I would say muses can inspire something as little as a name, to as much as the whole series. I personally, have multiple muses that influence lots of aspects of my series.
What advice would you like to pass on to young writers of today that is unconventional but true?
Don’t accept the status quo. So many people will tell you that writing isn’t a “real career” and that writers don’t make money. When they tell you that remind them that they told you to be anything you wanted. Of course, be a functioning member of society, but also chase that dream.
Which genre of book do you think should be most adopted for kids in school? – A big push in most schools is STEM programs. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math are all cornerstones of Sci-Fi. Sure, don’t teach kids fiction but give them something to enjoy learning. Like I said, I aim for my books to be as close to the truth as possible. I am sure there could be fiction books which cover STEM topics in a realistic and engaging way.
Is today’s generation more aware of the literary art or less?
I think much less. I think with few exceptions today most children don’t read anything they’re not required to read by a school’s curriculum and that is probably stretching it. Go to a busy mall on the weekend. Look at kids, they’re not reading books. They’re playing games. They’re taking selfies. Even just a decade ago you could go to a coffee shop and half of the people there were curled up with a book. Now you just see people come and go. If they stay they’re only there to use free wifi to connect on social media.
If you’re writing about a city/country/culture you haven’t physically visited, how much research do you conduct before you start writing?
I am writing about a whole universe that is completely make believe. However, this universe has a lot of the same laws of physics as ours. So I have done tons of research to make it believable as possible.
What are your views about elaborate synopsis of books at the back of the cover? Do you think they reveal too much?
I think that largely depends. Sometimes books are complex and you need to peel the onion back to really pique that interest. Other times you could say everything a prospective readers needs to know in a few words.

How possessive are you about your work?
I am very possessive. I worry constantly that somebody will take an idea I had and try to one up my book. Also, I don’t trust many people with the macro elements of my plot. However, I am rather willing to get the book into the wild and let the world enjoy the story.
Do you encourage your children to read?
Absolutely. My daughter loves to read. She only asks for books for presents. My son however, he doesn’t read as much but we do our best to find books that engage him. We insist he reads every day.
Do you enjoy discussing upcoming ideas with your partner? If yes, how much do you value their inputs?
My wife is a voracious reader, however she doesn’t particularly like Sci-Fi. With that being said I have a few people I’ve grown close to that I really enjoy going through my ideas with. We discuss plot holes, or continuity, or what if so-and-so did such-and-such…
Have you ever turned a dream or a nightmare into a written piece?
What writer hasn’t? I tend to dream more about my made up world when I have been writing for days on end. This is usually when I will get an interesting plot twist. Also, I have had dreams that weren’t related to my book that I thought would be interesting.
How long do you take to write a book?
I haven’t quite normalized my process yet. For my first book it took me about four months to write 57,000 words. My most recent book I wrote 65,000 words in 13 days. The biggest difference I planned my writing for about three weeks on my most recent book. I think that really sped up the process. I am hoping to get into a rhythm where I can write a book in about six to eight weeks.
Do you blog?
Yes, please have a look www.epwyck.wordpress.com
How active are you on social media? And how do you think it affects the way you write?
I try to be very active but I think that can often cause issues with focus while trying to write. I am regularly on Facebook and Twitter. I have an Instagram and Pinterest.

Alright folks, it is that time again but I would like to say a heart felt thank you to E.P. Wyck for allowing us to see what makes him tick.
Also, I would like to say a big thank you to the lovely readers out there for joining in and taking a moment to support your Authors.
If you or any of you know of someone who would like to be a part of Inside A Beautiful Mind, please send me a message.
Enjoy your Friday folks, you are awesome and please remember to be kind to your Authors, leave a review. See you in a couple of weeks, Peace!!

EP Wyck, E.P. Wyck, NaNoWriMo, #NaNoWriMo, Writing, Author, SciFi, Space Opera
epwyck.wordpress.com
 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06XG7YJ77

 

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